Lightfoot’s plans to impose Millennium Park curfew spark strong backlash – NBC Chicago

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s announcements of a new 10 p.m. curfew for minors and a 6 p.m. curfew for unaccompanied children at Millennium Park drew intense backlash, with some officials and activists saying these moves

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s announcements of a new 10 p.m. curfew for minors and a 6 p.m. curfew for unaccompanied children at Millennium Park drew intense backlash, with some officials and activists saying these moves are short-sighted and will only hurt the relationship. between the children and the city police.

The announcement of a curfew at Millennium Park comes after a shooting killed a 16-year-old boy at a large rally on Saturday night.

In response, Lightfoot announced that unaccompanied children under the age of 18 will not be allowed in Millennium Park after 6 p.m. Thursday through Sunday.

“Young people are welcome in the city center, but in the evening they must be accompanied by responsible adults,” she said.

Additionally, Lightfoot’s office announced that the city’s curfew for residents under 16, currently set at 11 p.m., would be moved to 10 p.m.

These two measures triggered a wave of reactions from activists and public officials.

“The mayor needs to take action, but it’s not the right way to do it,” said Enriquez Baltazar of the Little Village Community Council.

Groups like the LVCC and even the American Civil Liberties Union questioned the mayor’s plans on several fronts, including how the measure would be enforced and the impact it would have on the city’s children.

“It’s going to stereotype all the inner city kids,” Baltazar said. “Especially our young people from Little Village who go to work. There are jobs and activities downtown…and now they are limited.

“The mayor’s announcement suggests that our city’s showcase park should not be available to all Chicago residents,” the ACLU’s Ed Yohnka said in a statement to WTTW. “Curfews and bans create group guilt for all young people – whether they’re there to enjoy the sights and sounds of downtown or something else.”

At a community meeting Monday, Ald. Brian Hopkins invited members of the public to discuss the recent high-profile incidents in the city center

“I know we can’t live this way,” he said.

Over the weekend, there were 28 separate shootings in Chicago, leaving 28 injured and at least five dead.

Hundreds of residents gathered at the Moody Church Old Town campus on Monday to discuss recent high-profile incidents, including large groups at North Avenue Beach that caused several unrest and led to multiple arrests after a “rally not allowed” at the landmark on the north side.

Between that and Saturday’s shooting at Millennium Park, Hopkins says there’s plenty of evidence that something needs to be done.

“We can see what happened during Saturday night’s events downtown,” he said. “There are direct impacts on public safety.”

Hopkins is asking for additional pod cameras and license plate readers, with capabilities to determine if a car is missing its license plates.