Review: Tim Higgins’ “Power Play” Is a Tesla Charge Reveal

Tesla battery faults can be statistically insignificant compared to the problems with gas engines, which frequently explode in a short-term collision, as well as destroy the world with long-term emissions: battery fires are quite simply

Tesla battery faults can be statistically insignificant compared to the problems with gas engines, which frequently explode in a short-term collision, as well as destroy the world with long-term emissions: battery fires are quite simply terrifying and very dangerous on the rare occasion that they do to arrive. This is an interesting problem, which is not easy or attractive to communicate in marketing materials. But Tesla need not worry, as a disproportionate amount of press attention to the company is focused on Elon Musk.


Born in South Africa in 1971 to parents Errol and Maye Musk, respectively engineer and model, Elon Musk grew up in the apartheid era, went to Canada for college, then moved to the United States. , where he became a tech entrepreneur. worth millions in his late 20s thanks to his involvement with PayPal. Although Musk himself did not invent the technology that is the key to the Tesla product, he has built an extremely successful business around it, leveraging the enormous government grants for green technology and to position the company differently as a civilizational breakthrough.

What is really striking about Higgins’ portrayal of Musk is his need for multiple, even contradictory, narratives as he strives to embody both the business and technical aspects of Tesla. Higgins describes Musk as “notoriously thin-skinned” and sensitive to the accusation that he acquired, rather than created, Tesla. “When Valleywag suggested he didn’t deserve credit as the founder of PayPal,” for example, “Musk responded with a rebuttal of over 2,000 words, accompanied by footnotes. When Martin Eberhard attempted to sue Musk for libel in 2009, Higgins notes, Musk “responded on the company’s website with a massive account of Tesla’s story seen through his eyes.”

Its business strategy, as it appears in Power play, has been to promise futuristic technology at affordable prices, delegate the work to hired engineers and executives, and then blame (and fire) those staff as soon as foreseeable problems arise. While developing the Model X, Higgins says, Musk fired a paint shop manager for telling him that the production schedule he had already announced was impossible. “He was one of the many,” writes Higgins, “who would learn to keep their doubts to themselves if they wanted to keep their job.” The large number of people Musk pulls angrily into Power play is scary just to read. For a while, Higgins says, his anger often fell on an executive named Peter Rawlinson. In a disagreement, Musk “dominated Rawlinson in a disagreement. ” I do not believe you ! Musk screamed, placing a pointed finger on Rawlinson’s chest. ” I do not believe you ! “


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