Takeover of Google Long-Tail Ads.txt; The New Digital Media Barnacles

Here’s today’s roundup of AdExchanger.com news… Want it by email? Register here. The Google pub crawl Ads.txt was created to identify and help prevent fraud or non-transparent transactions in programmatic. But ads.txt also helps quantify

Here’s today’s roundup of AdExchanger.com news… Want it by email? Register here.

The Google pub crawl

Ads.txt was created to identify and help prevent fraud or non-transparent transactions in programmatic. But ads.txt also helps quantify Google’s advertising technology footprint.

Of the one million sites that carry the ads.txt specification and are tracked by Well-Known, an index of web domains and the standards they carry, 99% allow at least one Google Account and 97% list Google as a direct seller. (H/t to well-known creator @braedon.)

The second largest ads.txt penetration provider, Magnite, claims 24% coverage and 19% direct status. However, if you scale it down to the top 100,000 domains, Magnite improves to 73% of domain listings and 61% directly.

A lesson to be learned from this anecdotal data is that where Google dominates the most and gets much of its differentiation is the long tail. The first 100,000 domains are quite competitive, but the next 900,000 are almost entirely attributed to Google. The vast majority do not list Magnite or any other vendor.

Ninety percent of mobile apps list Google as app-ads.txt vendor. The next closest, Magnite again, reaches 74% of the top 100,000 application areas.

Identifiers are the new tags

Digital publishers have been spring cleaning in recent years, reducing their lists of vendors and the companies they allow to put a pixel on their site.

For years — since the inception of programmatic, in fact — ad tech companies have been carving their way into web domains in the form of beacons and server hits. Each little piece of code was insignificant on its own, but collectively they bloated the web and gave Google air cover to launch AMP.

Publishers seem concerned that the dynamic seems to be in effect again with alternative identity systems, Digiday reports.

“[Site] performance issues is death by a thousand paper cuts. Each of these elements adds up,” says one editor-in-chief.

Adding to the frustration is the fact that programmatic IDs, the hot new tech debt for publishers, are highly strategic for ad tech, meaning publishers are in a “rush” to adopt them.

“Whether it’s The Trade Desk or Yahoo, to work with them you’ll have to embrace [Yahoo’s] Next Generation ID or UID [which was originally developed by The Trade Desk] for this to happen,” says another editor at the publisher.

The truth must be told

Teens say TikTok needs to remove harmful content from its platform.

Naomi Sanders, 15, for her part, can’t avoid content that glorifies eating disorders, despite her best efforts, she says The Wall Street Journal.

TikTok has extended its ban on content related to eating disorders since the Journal published a investigation Last year. TikTok says it has released a tool allowing users to block content with a “Not Interested” tag.

But Sanders is still getting calorie counting videos, she tells the WSJ.

One problem is that some users circumvent TikTok’s algorithms with tactics like intentionally spelling eating disorders to post content that might otherwise get flagged or have stifled distribution.

YouTube has also been bugged lately because of its ‘dislike’ and ‘not interested’ buttons. hardly affects Distribution.

Algorithmic decision-making easily backfires on social media. For example, TikTok populated semi-complete searches like “diet hack” with automated suggestions like “diet hacks for women” and “diet snacks.”

“How can we expect kids to sift through all of this and know what’s safe and medically sound?” Rachel Fortune, doctor, asks the Journal.

But wait, there’s more!

The mobile game comes full circle with “Clawee”. [Financial Times]

Amazon will host a Prime Day in October, the first time it has held the biannual shopping event. [Bloomberg]

Two private equity firms are investing in MediaRadar. [release]

Netflix is ​​building its own game studio in Finland. [Engadget]

Google’s Algorithm’s Biggest Mystery: Everything That Was Said About Clicks, CTR, and Bounce Rate. [Search Engine Land]

TikTok is making progress on a US security deal, but hurdles remain. [NYT]

You are engaged!

Mobile gaming vet Kim Carlson joins Mobivity as Chief Revenue Officer. [release]

Former Zoom executive Heather Macaulay named president of MadTech Advisors. [MediaPost]